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We the North: Exploring Canada’s National Parks

Akami-Uapishku-KakKasuak-Mealy Mountains, Aulavik, Auyuittuq, Banff, Bruce Peninsula, Cape Breton Highlands, Elk Island, Forillon, Fundy, Georgian Bay Islands, Glacier, Grasslands, Gros Morne, Gulf Islands, Gwaii Haanas , Ivvavik, Jasper, Kejimkujik, Kluane, Kootenay, Kouchibouguac, La Mauricie, Mingan Archiepelago, Mount Revelstoke, Nááts’ihch’oh, Nahanni, Pacific Rim, Point Pelee, Prince Albert, Prince Edward Island, Pukaskwa, Qausuittuq, Quttinirpaaq, Riding Mountain, Rouge, Sable Island, Sirmilik, Terra Nova, Thousand Islands, Torngat Mountains, Tuktat Nogait, Ukkusiksalik, Vuntut, Wapusk, Waterton Lakes, Wood Buffalo, and Yoho. Phew. What a list. That totals 46 National Parks across Canada. (You can find out more about each park here.) For over 100 years, these natural spaces have been federally protected for environmental conservation and public enjoyment. And in honour of Canada 150, you have unrestricted access until the end of the year. Order your free Canada Discovery Park Pass today. This also includes boat and canal travel in National Marine Conservation Areas like Fathom…

Studying in Canada? Everything You Need to Know About Your Medical Coverage!

As you prepare to go back to school, watch this video to get comfortable with your insurance coverage. Let Ingle International guide you through a day in the life of insurance. Subtitled videos in multiple languages are also available further below. In these videos you will find: A break-down of your insurance package An introduction to the multilingual team that is looking after you Information on how to identify the level of your medical need (emergency room versus walk-in clinic) An overview of your toolbox, which includes, but is not limited to your website, Intrepid 24/7, the find a doctor tool and how to submit a claim. And more! Hot tip: Be a smart consumer, always read your policy wording. Watch this video with English, French, Spanish, Chinese or Vietnamese subtitles. For tips on how to prepare for the changing travel seasons, read articles here.

It Is Necessary to Protect your Visitors While They Are in Canada

If you’re expecting friends or family to be visiting you in Canada this summer, one of your top priorities should be to ensure they have appropriate travel insurance to cover them for any accident or illness they may encounter while in the country—and that means from the time they set foot on Canadian soil. Most Canadian travel insurance companies that cover you when you journey abroad or to the US have Visitor to Canada policies that can protect your visitors, but you need to understand how to assist them in applying for and choosing the policy that best meets their individual needs. The first thing they need to understand is that buying a plan before they exit their country is essential if they want to be covered from the moment they arrive in Canada.  If they purchase a policy after they arrive, there will be waiting period—usually 48 hours—before their…

Buying Travel Insurance Online? No Time for Haste

Misunderstanding or minimizing the content of travel insurance policies is one of the most frequent causes of claim denials—more so since online applications are gradually eliminating the advisory role of trained sales agents. Quick and easy online applications that can be completed in 5-10 minutes may fit conveniently into our busy schedules, but if they encourage carelessness or lack of attention, they can invite catastrophic consequences. Let’s look at the case reported recently in the British newspaper The Telegraph—of an English family that took a leisure trip to Berlin and on the way home found that their return flight had been cancelled for the day. Because the husband and son had urgent reasons to return to London, they took alternate and circuitous flights to get home as quickly as possible, encountering several hundred GBP in additional airfares. Bought in haste? That’s trouble The husband told the newspaper reporter that…

Travel to Canada

I have lived half my life in Canada, half in the US, and it has always amazed me that most Canadians I know personally, know more about travel in the US and abroad, than they do about Canada. It’s time to remedy that. But as with travel anywhere else, travel throughout Canada needs some foreknowledge—especially in respect to management of a medical emergency while out of your province. According to several recent surveys, about three quarters of Canadian frequent travelers buy some form of travel insurance when journeying out of the country. They know the financial risks they run by traveling uninsured. But they’re not so sure about the need for travel insurance to cover medical emergencies when traveling to other provinces even though all insurers strongly advise purchase of insurance for coverage within Canada. Do you need it? Portability of medical and hospital services for interprovincial travelers has…

Your Guide to Travel Awareness

During the terrorist attack on London UK, casualties and injuries resulted in 4 dead and 40 injured. Though residents and travellers appear more rattled than days prior, London Mayor Sadiq Khan resolves, “Londoners will never be cowed by terrorism.” In that breath, it is important to continue travelling and review terrorism preparedness procedures. Over 70 years, Ingle International has developed a wealth of resources about specific events of terror, as well as risk response best practices. Take advantage of these hand-picked articles below, and keep travelling. Common Sense Tourism Protection Lessons From Orlando, Stay Vigilant Terrorism is Changing the Face and Price of Travel Europe Tightens Border Rules, Prepare but Still Enjoy Trip Cancellation Interruption Insurance in Times of Terror How to Respond to Active Shooter Situations A Helpful Guide to Plan for Travel Emergencies Have a look at our travel insurance options.

Canada Has Eased the Visa Requirements for Mexican Travellers

Planning to visit Canada from Mexico? Good news! The Canadian government has lifted some of the visa requirements that were previously in place, making it easier for Mexican travellers to take trips up north. Here’s what you need to know about the new rules: As of December 1, 2016, Mexican travellers no longer require a visa for visits to Canada of up to six months. That said, Mexicans planning to travel to or transit through Canada will need an Electronic Travel Authorization (or eTA). Fortunately, this process can be completed in just a few minutes online for a cost of $7 CAD. You can take care of your eTA right here. Coming to study in Canada? If your study program will be shorter than six months, you’re good to go. For programs longer than that, however, you will still need to apply for a student visa. As well, work permits…

Product Spotlight: HCC Student Secure

Ingle International has a special place in its heart for international students. Foreign exchange programs are the foundation that the Ingle name is built on! That is why our 19th travel insurance spotlight is shining on the HCC Student Secure plan. The HCC Student Secure plan covers international students and scholars worldwide, regardless of your home country or destination. As a plan purchaser, you can expect coverage for physician and hospital visits, up to 80% coverage for prescriptions, and $50 towards paramedical visits such as a chiropractor and physiotherapist. Key features include: Daily rates as low as $1.45 Ambulance by ground or air from $300, up to $50, 000 Up to 80% coverage for mental health disorders Coverage for acute onset of pre-existing conditions (speak with your student insurance representative or check policy documents for an understanding on waiting periods and limitations) Browse more features Are you or your…

Seven Tips for Solo Travellers

Solo travel isn’t for everyone. In fact, I’m one of those people who isn’t especially fond of it. However, I also am one of those people who wouldn’t stop myself from going somewhere just because I couldn’t find a partner in crime to go with. It’s hard to find people who have the ability, flexibility and want to travel to the same places at the same time as you, so sometimes, solo travel is a must. However, solo travelling doesn’t need to be intimidating. Naturally, we like to be with people that we know, especially when we’re doing something brave like going to a new country, but travelling solo can bring all sorts of its own benefits. Here are some tips to ensure you have the best time while on your solo adventure. Stay in hostels One of the biggest fears of solo travellers is how they are going…

What Type of Travel Insurance Do I Need?

You’ve heard it here before: travel insurance is not a one-size-fits-all sort of purchase. That’s why Ingle carries an extensive list of insurance products to cover all sorts of travelling scenarios. But if you’re not familiar with all the ins and outs of travel insurance, looking at the long list of available options out there can feel a little daunting—like having too many brands to choose from in the grocery store. So, what exactly are all these different plan categories? And which one is right for you? With a few quick questions, we can help you figure that out.   1. ARE YOU CANADIAN? Yes, I’m Canadian. For most travelling Canadians, however, Canadian Travellers Insurance offers extensive coverage for a wide range of scenarios. In addition to travel medical coverage for illness and injury abroad, there are also non-medical coverage options for things like cancelled and delayed transport, lost…

5 Tips for Part-Time Travellers

Not everyone can quit their jobs and travel full-time—it’s just not a lifestyle that suits the majority of people. But having a career and a life at home doesn’t mean you have to wait until you retire to travel. Despite what people may think, it’s possible to see the world and maintain a career and home base. Here are five tips that will help you succeed with part-time travel. 1. Use your vacation days In 2015, more than half of Americans left vacation days unused. In most of North America, employees get two to three weeks of vacation, but so many people don’t take advantage of these days and instead let them go to waste. Those with full-time jobs are in the best position to travel because they have a steady income. So stop feeling guilty about asking for time off from your job, you’ve earned it! 2.…

8 Myths about the Full-Time Travel Lifestyle

When I sold everything to travel, I couldn’t imagine a time when I’d say I’ve been on the road for 10 years. But here we are, 10 years later. I’ve travelled through and/or lived in over 50 countries in that time. And I’ve learned a lot about what “full-time travel” really means. Here are eight myths about the full-time travel lifestyle that I’ve learned along the way (often the hard way!). Myth: Full-Time Travel Is an Extended Vacation Full-time travel is a lifestyle rather than a trip or vacation. When travelling full-time, there’s no “regular life” or “home” to return to, like there is if you are travelling for a limited time. This creates a different mindset around foundational ideas like what home is, and ultimately, how to create that sense of home abroad. Myth: Full-Time Travel Is for Rich People Most full-time travellers work in some way…

The Best Canadian Winter Adventures According to Travel Bloggers

Nobody does winter like Canadians. When it’s twenty below and school has been cancelled for snow, most people put a kettle on the stove, turn up the thermostat, and curl up in a blanket. Canadians, on the other hand, bundle up the kids, pull on a toque, and head for the sledding hill. Yes, Canadians have made an art of enjoying the cold. (How else could you explain our passion for curling?)  But even we forget how many awesome winter activities we’ve developed over the years. To help remind us of all the rad things there are to do this winter, I asked 12 travel bloggers to share their favourite Canadian winter adventures. Here’s what they told me. Take a Snow Bath at the Quebec Winter Carnival Quebec City’s Winter Carnival is a 62-year-old tradition that brings the city to life during some of the coldest weeks of winter.…

Buying Travel Insurance: Apply in Good Faith. But Verify. 

Time and again, travelers who have had their out-of-country health insurance claims denied complain that they applied for coverage “in good faith” and expected full and complete coverage after paying their premiums and heading out for a carefree vacation. If only it were that simple. First, let’s make it clear that according to most reliable surveys—the most recent being one by Canada’s provincial and territorial insurance regulators—the number of travel insurance claims denied is minuscule when compared to the millions of trips actually taken. But, statistics aside, if it’s your claim that’s denied leaving you with the burden of a large foreign hospital or medical bill, it doesn’t matter how many millions of others have been approved and paid. It hurts. So what must you do to shield yourself from the possibility of having your claim for an out-of-country medical claim denied? Read all That? Get Real. We could…

Travel Fatigue and How to Avoid It

I’ve been proverbially homeless for 10 years, travelling through and living in over 50 countries. Over the years, I’ve experimented with many different styles—and paces—of travel. In 2010, embracing a “backpacker” moniker, I breezed through a dizzying number of countries. In that entire year, the longest I spent in one place was three weeks; on average I “moved house” every five nights. After this fevered travel pace, I spent the first six months of 2011 in a near-comatose state of recovery. Something wasn’t right. I couldn’t quite define what was wrong, but I had an unsettled feeling. I was fundamentally tired, like I hadn’t slept well in months. On reflection, this was true; too many late nights, early mornings, unfamiliar beds, and communal living quarters had taken a toll. I was dizzyingly confused; the whirlwind of travel in the previous year left me feeling like the world was spinning around…

4 Reasons Your Insurance Claim Might Be Denied

When you buy travel insurance, the hope is that you are purchasing some peace of mind for your trip. However, every once in a while, a high-profile case hits the news about a claim that was denied, leaving the claimants with huge medical bills. This understandably has some travellers concerned about how much they can actually rely on their insurance policy. The good news is: as long as you fully understand the workings of your insurance policy, there’s no need to fear an unexpected surprise from your insurer. To help you gain that confidence, let us explain the four main reasons why someone’s insurance claim might be denied. Why could my claim be denied?  1. Because your claim was related to a pre-existing condition. This is a term one hears often when it comes to travel medical insurance, and there can be some confusion around what it really means.…

Travel to Canada Surges, So Does the Need for Medical Protection

Canada remains an increasingly attractive country to visit. Recent data from Statistics Canada verifies that in the first 8 months of 2016, the number of visitors from Europe, Asia Pacific, Central and South America, and to a lesser degree the United States ( due to a poorly performing loonie) have been breaking records. According to Statistics Canada’s August 2016 Tourism Snapshot: Canada welcomed 12.4 million overnight visits from international travelers from its 11 most popular overseas destinations in the first 8 months of 2016. That is up 10.4 percent over the comparable period in 2015—14.4 percent if travel from the US is discounted. And where are all of these visitors coming from? China is comes in first with 428,000 visitors, followed by Europe’s 3 main markets (UK, France, Germany), Japan, South Korea, Australia, India and increasingly from South America as well. Analysis of the numbers indicate that many come to…

A Zen Guide to Heartbreak while Travelling

A heart-wrenching breakup is agonizing under any circumstances. But doing it while travelling adds a whole new set of complications. I’ve had a few cracks at breaking up while travelling. The first was three years into my full-time travel lifestyle; my boyfriend and I had been together for a year when we sold everything to travel. I learned some key lessons about travelling with a partner during our three years on the road: Travelling accelerates the natural progression of a relationship. Travel’s inherent stressors create interpersonal tension. It’s imperative to claim your space, since you’re together 24/7. You might stay together longer than you should. This last point was the most difficult for me: our relationship was over long before we broke up. But we were in Australia, my boyfriend had run out of money, and he was working to replenish it. I couldn’t just leave him on the other…

Take the Stress Out of Packing

The number one thing I realized, after years of stressing out and over-packing, was that I really didn’t need as much as I thought I did. I didn’t need to bring my favourite outfits along with all their matching accessories. I was going on a vacation, not a photo shoot.  Who cares if I am wearing the same thing in every photo? It’s not about what I am wearing. It is about where I am. The experience. The scenery. The people. My packing epiphany came to me as I stood in Pearson International Airport in Toronto, Canada, and watched in horror as my suitcase came down the conveyor belt. Actually, I saw my clothes first, as they tumbled out of my busted, exposed, and overstuffed suitcase. Twelve hours earlier, sweaty and tearful, I had been sitting collapsed on top of my suitcase. I’d finally managed to close it when I…

Riding Alone across the Continent: Therapy on Horseback

On July 8, 2012, when I jumped into the saddle to ride horseback from Canada to Brazil, I had no idea the journey of solitude I was about to undertake. There were times during the 803 days I spent on the road when family and friends met me, but for the majority of the trip, it was just my horses and me. Some nights I met generous people who kindly hosted me in their homes, while other nights were spent camping in the wilderness. But every day, while I rode, I spent eight to ten hours alone. Without saying a word. Or hearing one. Some days my voice hardly came out in the afternoon. And on some stretches I went days without seeing or conversing with another human being. Being left alone with your thoughts for such long periods of time, away from your family and loved ones, is not…

How to “Vet” Your Travel Insurance Policy

Critics of travel insurance often argue that claim denials are too frequent, unfair to the customer, and might be avoided if issuers vetted policy applications at the time of distribution instead of when a claim is made. The rationale for that argument is that applicants could then be certain that their policy would pay off in case of medical emergency abroad. Sounds reasonable, as a principle—except that it’s impractical given the millions of policies issued to Canadian travelers each year. At present, most policies are issued on the understanding that customers provide complete and accurate information about their medical histories when applying for insurance. Some are asked a few questions about recent treatment interventions, medication use, or hospitalizations; others, usually elderly travelers, are required to complete detailed medical questionnaires designed to give underwriters a more precise assessment of their health status. And there are other policies—usually attached to credit cards—that…

Product Spotlight! Sporting Coverage with TuGo

Are you travelling abroad for a sporting adventure? You will need to make sure you have travel insurance to match—as your average plan often does not include coverage for injuries sustained while taking part in sports. Luckily, we have TuGo’s Traveller Emergency Medical plan on hand, which automatically includes coverage for most amateur and professional sports. Here’s a quick rundown of some of the plan’s highlights: In addition to coverage for amateur sports, for those who like push the envelope, you have the choice of add-ons for contact sports, adventure sports, and extreme sports. In other words, you can tailor the plan to fit just the types of adventures you like to have. The plan includes emergency transport: either air ambulance or economy airfare back to your home province or territory. Some common sports injuries (like a broken leg) can make travelling difficult, and an air ambulance back to your home…

Alternatives to Travellers Cheques

At one time, travellers cheques were the preferred way to carry foreign currency. They were secure, low on fees, and in some cases were the only way to pay for things abroad. But they’ve been going steadily out of favour since the 1990s. They pose security risks and cause extra work for retailers, the commissions and fees aren’t competitive, and even banks abroad are hesitant to cash them. A reader told me about a European vacation during which she visited 12 banks, none of which were willing or able to cash her travellers cheques. These days, there are other, more secure and cost-effective ways to access your money while travelling, such as the following: Credit Cards In most Western countries, you can pay for almost everything with credit cards. Many of my North American friends don’t even carry cash any more. Credit cards are convenient, they provide a record…

How to Buy Travel Insurance Safely – Part II

Canada’s travel insurance market is rich in choice, even if you’re not quite as healthy as an Olympic athlete. But before you get to the nitty-gritty of comparing products and prices, you should sort out your basic needs according to your general health, age, duration, frequency and purpose of travel. Let’s narrow down the choices to make them more specific to your individual needs. No frills, No Pre-existing Coverage Required If you’re perfectly healthy, take no medications, have no medical history, see your doctor only once a year for an annual checkup, and are not under orders to have tests taken or to see a specialist, consider a basic plan that does not cover pre-existing conditions nor asks you to complete a medical questionnaire. It is the cheapest, and the least complicated to buy: so long as your medical history is as impeccable as you think.  But don’t delude…

Podcast – Lily Likes It Here

The Lily Likes It Here podcast came to fruition over the winter of 2016 shortly after sisu production hit the frosty streets of Toronto to conduct interviews about the NBA all-star weekend. Later, in a warmer think tank, sisu and other creatives held a podcast brainstorm. At first, a common thread that tied all of our colleagues together was their love of travel. Or so we thought, until Lily expressed an attitude of indifference towards it. The road to Lily’s logic is far more complex than opposition, and we are determined to learn more about it. Welcome to Lily Likes It Here. Join Lily and her panel of distinguished guests as they duel over distant lands, culinary firsts, and missed connections. Lily doesn’t not like to travel, per se—she just hasn’t been inspired to. Can she be convinced to leave the comforts of home and travel the world? Tune in…

4 Tips To Start Your School Year Abroad

September is “back to school” season—time to gear up for another fresh year of learning. As you move into the start of a new school year, it’s natural to have hopes and expectations for a fulfilling experience. So we’ve put together a few tips to help you start off on the right foot. Here at Ingle, we believe that if you want to have a rewarding school year, it’s important to take good care of yourself—because health concerns are the last thing you want on your mind while you study for exams! With that in mind, here are four tips for a happy and healthy school year, along with some handy resources to see you through. 1. Make yourself a priority. There can be a lot of pressure to stay on top of your coursework while also enjoying extracurricular activities and maybe, possibly, having some semblance of a social life…

How to Make a Portable Travel Workout Kit

One of the biggest drawbacks of travel is its effect on your health. As a travel blogger and fitness enthusiast I’m very familiar with the struggle. When you travel, all of the healthy habits and routines you’ve worked so hard to develop are thrown into disarray. The restaurant food you rely on is notoriously high in calories and fat—and even if you were disciplined enough to maintain a regular workout routine at home, that routine is obliterated by the schedule changes and uncertain access to exercise facilities that inevitably come with travel. Despite the challenges, staying in shape on the road is not at as hard as it may first seem. In fact, it’s nearly as easy as staying fit at home if you know what you’re doing. Your body is built to stay fit through unassisted movements like running, swimming, and climbing. A gym is nice to have, but…

Why “Remote Year” Is the Perfect Solution to my Millennial Wanderlust

 It all started around the time I was approaching 30. My life felt predictably laid out ahead of me. I knew I was in search of something to break up the monotony and give me that “alive” feeling—but what? Travel had always been a passion of mine, and although my last trip to Costa Rica had satiated my wanderlust for a while, the feeling had begun to return. Then, after scanning tour sites, I found a Facebook ad for Remote Year. “Travel the world as a digital nomad for a year! Visit 12 countries and meet 75 new friends!” This opportunity seemed too good to be true, but I clicked to read more. What is Remote Year? Remote Year is a start-up organization that coordinates a year-long remote working experience for professionals with a passion for travel. Each group visits 12 countries throughout the year, living in a different…

16 Tips for Carrying Cash

This financial travel tip comes to you courtesy of pickpockets, petty thieves, and absent-minded travellers. Cash comes and goes easily on the road, and to preserve it involves stashing and managing it wisely. Here are 16 tips for carrying cash safely and securely while you travel the world. General Tips for Carrying Cash For some travellers, the question is not where or how to carry cash, but whether to use cash at all. In most western countries, you can pay for almost everything with debit and credit cards. (See also: How Many Debit/Credit Cards to Carry). However even in these countries, it’s prudent to have cash available for tips, transportation (taxis and buses), and emergency needs (if your cards don’t work). In many other countries, cash is king. Debit purchases are almost unheard of, and credit card purchases entail extra fees. In both cases, these tips below will enhance…

Multi-Trip Annual Plans for Each Slice of the Travel Pie

If you’re anything like me, you’ll find that trips are like pizzas—as soon as they’re finished, you can’t help but think about your next one. And no one knows this better than Canadians, who continue to travel more than ever. This is why travel insurers offer multi-trip annual plans to cater to the needs of frequent travellers. By covering an unlimited number of trips over the course of a year, annual plans ensure you’ll be covered for each trip AND save you money. Not sure if you need single-trip or multi-trip travel insurance? If you’re one of the following types of traveller, a multi-trip annual plan is for you… The weekender Do you love to dart across the border for some binge shopping at an outlet mall? Are you hooked on US football games (or at least the tailgating beforehand)? No matter how short the trip or how young…

Four Reasons Why Travelling with Your Parents Is a Blessing in Disguise

Family trips were great—when you were a kid. But now it seems that your family is more of a travel limitation than an asset. When you are with your parents, you lose almost all of your independence, younger siblings can become annoying tag-alongs, and some activities you just can’t do with your family (family outing to a nightclub, anyone?). It’s not all bad, though. Family vacations offer several benefits over travelling solo. Here are four reasons why travelling with your family is a blessing in disguise. They pay! Flights, food, accommodation, and travel costs add up quickly. Fortunately, they usually aren’t your problem when you are on a family vacation. Parents are usually more than willing to spend money on activities that bring the family together, so you should use this to your advantage! Enjoy a few free meals at restaurants, go scuba diving or parasailing, whatever. Just be…

5 Easy Ways to Be a Sustainable Traveller

Travel is one of the most unsustainable industries in the world. Don’t believe me? Just recently, Thailand closed Koh Tachai Island to visitors due to overcrowding, which was having a devastating impact on local ecosystems. The damage was so severe that many, myself included, will likely never have the pleasure of visiting the island. Tourism is also one of the best ways to boost a suffering economy. But economic stimulus isn’t exactly top of mind when travellers head out—adventure, memories, selfies, gifts, and nice weather usually take priority over our environmental considerations. There are many little ways to help reduce the negative impacts of tourism, and they are easy to apply when you take the time to properly plan out your adventures. To help bring more “consciousness” to the way you travel, I’ve put together five easy ways to reduce the negative impact your travels have on our beautiful earth…

How to Travel Gluten-Free

Travelling can present its challenges, but toss in a food allergy or dietary restriction and it can be downright daunting.  However, my own gluten intolerance hasn’t prevented me from travelling—in fact, it has been a key component in fuelling my desire to travel. I wanted to defy the misconception that I would be limited as a gluten-intolerant traveller, and since my diagnosis three years ago I have travelled to more exotic and foreign places than I ever had before. I didn’t know that the travel bug would bite me so hard, but it did, and I am always looking ahead to my next adventure (and next international cuisine to take on, gluten-free style). Thankfully I am now well-versed and always equipped with the essentials (and more) to successfully travel gluten-free. Here are my tips for travelling gluten-free (or GF). Try them out, share with a friend, or modify to make…

Ingredients for a Successful Group Vacation

When approached with the right attitude and planned properly, travelling with friends and family is one of life’s most enjoyable experiences. Here are some tried and true tips to turn your group vacations into some of your best memories ever. 1. Communicate Early Address the five “W”s plus “how.” Who is going? A group of people may decide they want to travel together. Or, one person may invite others to join in on a holiday, such as my recent birthday celebration in Tuscany. Make sure all travellers know who is interested in going before they make a commitment. Where to go? So many choices, so little time. What does everyone want to do on the vacation? What are their expectations? Why do they want to go? Find out your companions’ priorities—do they hope to spend time with friends, see the sights or just get away from it all? When…

Why Travel is My Drug of Choice

I’m Jane, and I’m a travel addict. Lucky for me, supply is not a problem. In fact, with competitive airfares, alternate types of accommodation, and a proliferation of money-saving tips, it’s never been easier to travel almost anywhere on almost any budget. (I’ve even become a travel blogger myself, so I can legitimately get high on my own supply.) And I’m not alone—I just have to go on the web and search for anything with the word “travel” in it, a country name, or a specific attraction, and I’ll get pages and pages of results that connect me with other wanderers waiting to get their next real-world fix. Call it my support group. So it always surprises me when I encounter people who have little or no desire to travel, a fact that is incomprehensible to someone with my disease. And yet there are more of these UnTravellers than you…

Stop Travelling to “Visit”—Try Living in Your Next Vacation Spot

I recently moved to Valencia, Spain, for a month—a little crazy, right? Who jets off to Spain for a whole month? It’s hard enough to set aside two weeks of vacation time, let alone four. While my situation is not the norm, I have been relishing my month in Spain, and have learned a valuable nugget about how to enhance your travel experience: to really get to know a city, instead of just “visiting” there, go and live there for whatever time you have. Here are a few ways that setting up a home base will enhance your experience in your next vacation spot. 1. Navigation Walking around Spain with a giant map, or with your eyes permanently glued to the Google Maps app, screams “tourist” and will prevent you from enjoying what the city has to offer in the moment. However, you will inevitably get lost at least once…